Tenrikyo-Spreading God’s Truth

On Saturday my wife and I went to a bookstore. When we were entering our car to leave, a middle age Asian woman comes running toward the car and waving at us. For a moment I thought we had forgotten something at the bookstore.  But as I open the door slightly, she asked us if we wanted to know about Jesus Christ.  Surprised by her question, I quickly shut the door and shook my head no and drove off.

Looking back at the incident, I am not usually comfortable with solicitors, especially in parking lots; but I am moved by her courage and her commitment to spread what she believes to be true.  It is the same for those pesky church people who scout our neighborhood during the weekend, going door to door and leaving their pamphlets, which usually end up in our recycle bin.

In the Ofudesaki, in chapter 14 God tells us to go out and tell people that God will begin to work. This is called hinokishin. We must spread our teachings before God accepts our prayer (Joyous Service or Kagura Service) to save mankind. Instead of believing that by performing the Yorozuyo and twelve songs and visiting Ojiba that God will save us, we must do our job of spreading our religion first (hinokishin).  These instructions are in the Ofudesaki, and the Mikagura-uta, but many of us still believe that by performing the Yorozuyo and the 12 songs perfectly in Japanese will bring God’s salvation.

The question arises, what will bring upon new members to our churches? Would it be people like the middle aged oriental woman going door to door, or in her case car to car?  Or will it be a group of people dressed in samurai clothing, dancing to the songs of the Mikagura-uta in Japanese?  The answer is in the Ofudesaki!

About heaventruth

A fundamentalist in the translation and interpretation of the Book of Prophecy (Ofudesaki), as it relates to the world today and in the future.
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